What are the rules for working if I'm on a stamp 2 student visa?

Abigail McConnell
Abigail McConnell
  • Updated

International students on a valid student visa (stamp 2) are permitted to reside in the State and to avail of a work concession for casual work without a work permit.

Casual part-time employment is defined as working up to a maximum of 20 hours per week.
There are two times during the year that Students can work up to 40 hours per week. They are Christmas from 15 December to 15 January and Summer from 1 June to 30 September. The rules around working part time and full time are set by the Irish Government and your visa status and not NCI.

Other frequently asked questions about working in Ireland as an International Student on a Stamp 2 visa,

 

What do students need to work in Ireland?
1. A valid (in date) Stamp 2 Student visa stamped in their passport and an Irish Residency Permit (IRP Card). Please see here for information on how to register with immigration.
2. A tax number (PPSN)

 

How do employers know that students can work without a work permit?
Immigration Service Delivery (formally known as INIS) have a note for employers on their website. See Question ‘Can I work while studying?’ Also, employers can check that a student has a valid stamp 2 immigration permission by checking their Irish Residency Permit (IRP Card). This card identifies the student, their immigration permission and the date it is valid until.

Students can also provide their employer with a letter from NCI confirming these conditions. To request this letter please go to NCI360.

 

Can I work remotely for an employer outside Ireland?
All employers must abide by Irish law for tax purposes and employment rights. If working for an employer that is outside Ireland, the employer is liable to pay taxes (stamps e.g PAYE, USC etc) and the employee is obliged to pay taxes. The employer must contact revenue and compete a TR1 Form. Employers can find further information online, by searching S985D TCA 1997 Exercise of Foreign Employment in Ireland.

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